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Tutankhamun’s treasures pay a final visit to the UK

There can be few finds in history to have captured the imagination more than the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb in Egypt in 1922.

Discovered in the Valley of the Kings near Luxor by Lord George Carnarvon and Howard Carter, it took Carter six years to excavate the tomb of the boy king – who was crowned at 9 and dead by 19. By the time he had finished, he had uncovered more than 5,000 objects, many of which were made of solid gold, and including Tutankhamun’s incredible death mask.

As well as being famous for the many amazing finds the tomb held of course, it will forever be associated with the curse of the pharaohs, which, it is alleged, means that anyone who disturbs a mummy will suffer the consequences of illness, injury or death.

Bolstering this legend, Carnarvon famously died a few months after the discovery, from an infected mosquito bite, followed by a number of members of the team through various causes. Carter managed to live until 1939 but still died prematurely at the age of 64 from Hodgkin’s disease.

Hopefully the curse doesn’t stretch as far as sightseers. While many of the artifacts are held in Egypt, some have been on a global tour and with 4 November the anniversary of Lord Carnarvon and Howard Carter’s discovery, the exhibition is coming to London’s Saatchi Gallery.

TUTANKHAMUN: Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh runs from 2 November until 3 May next year and includes 150 pieces from the tomb. This is three times the quantity seen in previous exhibitions, and more than 60 of these are travelling outside of Egypt for the first time. London is the third stop on the exhibition’s tour, with the show the final chance to see the treasures before they return to Egypt forever for permanent display at the Grand Egyptian Museum when it opens in 2021.

You can find out more and book tickets here: https://tutankhamun-london.com/

Julie PentecostTutankhamun’s treasures pay a final visit to the UK
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