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A place to remember and celebrate our supporters

A place to remember and celebrate our supporters

Guy’s and St Thomas’ rank among the oldest and best-known teaching hospitals. They have withstood the Black Death, the plague, Wars of the Roses, the Great Fire of London and the Blitz.

Today, Guy’s and St Thomas’ Foundation Trust is one of the UK’s busiest and most successful foundation trusts, with a long history of clinical excellence and high-quality patient care.

The hospitals provide a full range of services for the local community in Lambeth, Southwark and Lewisham. They also provide specialist services for patients from further afield, including in the areas of cancer, cardiovascular, women’s and children’s services, kidney care and orthopaedics.

Guy’s and St Thomas’ Charity supports the hospital by funding specialist equipment, life-changing research and the small changes that are above and beyond what the NHS can provide. Donations help to make a big difference in the lives of our patients.

Legacy and in memory gifts are integral to funding improvements for our hospitals and it’s important that we show our gratitude for these very special donations. With this in mind we created a remembrance book to celebrate our legacy and in memory supporters. By giving something back we are also able to create a lasting connection with our donors.

Emma Simpson – Legacy and In Memory Fundraiser at Guy’s and St Thomas’ Charity

 

 

 

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Julie PentecostA place to remember and celebrate our supporters

In-memory givers prove three times more likely to pledge a legacy

With legacy giving such a vital income source for so many charities, it was interesting to read of the link between giving in memory, and legacy pledges late last month.

Research carried out by Legacy Foresight, analysts of the legacy and in-memoriam sectors, revealed that remembrance is an important motivation for leaving a legacy, with supporters who had a known in-memory connection to a charity three times more likely to pledge a legacy to it. They were also twice as likely to be legacy prospects than standard regular donors giving via direct debit or standing order.

Remembrance also had an impact on how much people bequeathed. Residuary legacies (a gift given out of an estate once all debts, taxes and specific legacies have been paid) from those with a known in-memory connection were two-thirds greater in value, when compared with those left by supporters with no known in-memory connection, while pecuniary legacies (the gift of a specified amount) were double the size.

Legacy Foresight’s research showed that many people are leaving in-memory gifts in their wills too, with two in five legacy donors including at least one. Three out of five of these in-memory legacies had been preceded by a previous in-memory gift, with donations often made at or after a funeral.

Most were left in remembrance of parents, partners and in-laws, as well as friends, with three-quarters of in-memory legacies going to health-related charities.

The figures emphasise the importance of good donor stewardship during that long journey from giving in-memory or making a legacy pledge. And in fact, an earlier March 2019 survey by Legacy Foresight among its charity consortium members showed that 84% expected to be investing more in legacy stewardship over the next five years with 46% feeling it hadn’t yet become a big enough priority in their organisation.

The findings also included some tips on legacy stewardship, finding the best activities to be those that show the impact of their gift, while conveying magic, and surprising and delighting supporters. Many of the charities it questioned said they offered legacy supporters special ‘behind the scenes’ access with everything from invites to new ward openings at Great Ormond Street Hospital, to walks with a Guide Dog puppy.

It’s certainly food for thought, and for further reading, Legacy Foresight’s reports can be downloaded from its site.

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Julie PentecostIn-memory givers prove three times more likely to pledge a legacy

Fundraising without a budget? Here’s a new idea!

What if you could engage and delight your supporters – and raise funds – for just the price of a couple of links on your website?

fundraising without a budget

This month at The Online Book Company, we’re excited to announce a brand new product to help you do precisely that. Set to launch in mid February, it will enable you to raise funds simply by offering supporters the opportunity to create their very own Online Books that they can fill with their photos, videos, and memories and share.  As with other social media platforms like Facebook people will have the option of sharing with family and friends all over the world.

The Books are suitable for a whole range of purposes: supporters sponsoring or adopting an animal could create a book about them with their adoption certificate, pictures, video, thoughts and memories, while others could use them to record and remember special events such as birthdays, weddings, and anniversaries.

For charities, there is no risk and for those coming on board with us before the end of April 2020 requires no financial outlay.  Through our platform we will provide your own fully branded microsite for you to direct supporters to.  Once on the microsite, they will be able to choose from a selection of templated book covers, or create their own.

The books can be branded to your charity, and each one will initially cost the individual £12.50 + VAT per year: £5 of which we will return to you annually as a donation.

The Books are simple to create, easy to update and share, and can also be printed. All the supporter has to do is upload their photos, memories and experiences into our simple system, and then publish their creation online.

As the perfect way to keep memories alive, these Books will be something people can continue to add to, and revisit. For those who also wish to have a physical copy, there will be the option to print the books, using our specialist print partner.

If you’d like to learn more about how these Books could help your charity, please do give us a call on 01872 226800 to make an appointment for a non-committal screen share, and we’ll be happy to show you!

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Julie PentecostFundraising without a budget? Here’s a new idea!

What to look forward to in 2020

January can be a bleak month following the excitement of Christmas: cold and dark with summer seeming a long way off. Here then is our pick of some of the best looking films and books to look out for in 2020, to give us all something to look forward to!

What to look forward to in 2020

1917

10th January sees the release of 1917, a Sam Mendes film about two young British soldiers in World War One in a race against time to save their comrades from attack. It stars Benedict Cumberbatch, and Colin Firth as well as George MacKay and Dean-Charles Chapman in the lead roles.

1917 – Official Trailer [HD] (YouTube)

 

Mulan

This new version of Mulan is one of several Disney films to get a live action makeover this year. Out in March, it sees Chinese-American actress Liu Yifei plays Mulan, who disguises herself as a man to fight in place of her father in China’s imperial army, with the film also starring Jason Scott Lee, Jet Li and Donnie Yen.

Disney’s Mulan – Official Teaser (YouTube)

 

No Time to Die

James Bond fans have to wait until April for No Time to Die to appear at the cinemas. It’s the 25th outing for the hero, and is rumoured to be Daniel Craig’s last. In the film, Bond finds himself pulled out of retirement to fight a new villain played by Rami Malek, the actor last seen as Freddie Mercury in last year’s Bohemian Rhapsody.

NO TIME TO DIE Trailer (YouTube)

 

Black Widow

One for Avengers fans, Marvel Studios releases Black Widow in May. Starring Scarlett Johansson as Black Widow, it follows the events of 2016’s Captain America: Civil War and sees Natasha Romanoff alone and on the run from the US government for helping Captain America escape with Bucky. She finds herself forced to revisit unfinished business and coming face-to-face with the Red Room: the mysterious organisation that trained her and hundreds of girls like her.

Marvel Studios’ Black Widow – Official Teaser Trailer (YouTube)

 

Ghostbusters 2020

A great one for the summer holidays, this looks set to be more popular than the last Ghostbusters outing in 2016, not least because it sees Dan Aykroyd, Bill Murray and Sigourney Weaver reprise their original roles. Fans of Stranger Things will also be excited to see it stars Finn Wolfhard who plays Mike Wheeler in the Netflix show. The film sees a mum and her two children move to a small town where they discover their connection to the original Ghostbusters and the secret legacy left behind by their grandfather.

GHOSTBUSTERS: AFTERLIFE – Official Trailer (HD) (YouTube)

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Julie PentecostWhat to look forward to in 2020

Festive glow: Christmas light trails around the UK

The festive period is upon us and Christmas is just a few short sleeps away, so to help get everyone in the mood, here is a selection of the Christmas light trails taking place around the country. Here’s hoping for dry starry nights, steaming mugs of hot chocolate, and some wonderful nights out.

Festive glow Christmas lights

Christmas at Stourhead
While other National Trust properties have been putting on Christmas light trails for a few years, this is the first time Stourhead in Wiltshire has done so. Christmas at Stourhead sees a Tunnel of Light with over 100,000 pea-lights, Singing Trees, and glowing blossom and twinkling hedgerows leading visitors on a path towards thousands of illuminated lights on Fibre Optic Lawn. There is also a Laser Garden, and a scented Fire Garden among other attractions, and the chance to enjoy a hot drink and some marshmallows.  Father Christmas is also rumoured to be putting in an appearance.

When: To 30 December
Where: Stourhead, Stourton, Wiltshire
Link: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/stourhead/features/christmas-at-stourhead-2019

Blenheim Palace
Treetops will glisten and the Great Lake and the waterfall will shimmer and sparkle at Blenheim Palace this Christmas, while a one-mile glittering path will lead guests through the world-famous Parkland in a magical after dark experience. New for this year too are Sky-Lights, a colourful aerial light show, and The Cascade’s dynamic waterfall. There are also mesmerising and immersive ribbons of light at Vines as well as the quieter glow of flowers along Blenheim’s beautiful Snowdrop Walk.

When: To 5 January
Where: Blenheim Palace, Oxfordshire
Link: https://www.blenheimpalace.com/christmas/

Longleat Festival of Light

This winter, Longleat’s annual Festival of Light takes myths and legends from across the world as its theme. The legends on display include St George slaying the dragon, the giant Kraken engulfing a full-sized ship on the lake, the minotaur, King Midas, Medusa and Thor. There is also a life-sized recreation of a palace from the Arabian Nights and in total the festival features more than 3,000 lanterns, using 50,000 LED lights and 30,000 metres of silk.

When: To 5 January
Where: Longleat Safari Park, Warminster, Wiltshire
Link: https://www.longleat.co.uk/festival-of-light

Westonbirt Arboretum Enchanted Christmas
Westonbirt Arboretum has a new Christmas trail for this year, created by fairies who have been casting their spells over the trees to transform it into an enchanted wood full of woodland characters. There is also the Arboretum’s Christmas village to visit where visitors can create some Christmas arts and crafts, explore the market stalls and warm up with a cup of hot chocolate or mulled wine.

When: Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays from 29 November to 22 December
Where: Westonbirt, The National Arboretum, Tetbury
Link: https://www.forestryengland.uk/westonbirt/enchanted-christmas

Christmas at Kew
Christmas at Kew is now in its seventh year, and sees dynamic laser projections illuminate the Temperate House, and a dazzling arch lead to a cascade of glowing silvery shards at the Treetop Walkway. Visitors can also walk amongst immersive vines with changing ribbons of light, and wander beneath the branches illuminated with the glow of Will-o’the Wisp. Holly bushes will also sing, there will be a Tunnel of Light, and the Palm House Pond finale will see jumping jets of light dance across the water to the sound of Christmas classics.

When: To 5th January
Where: Kew Gardens, London
Link: https://www.kew.org/kew-gardens/whats-on/christmas

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Julie PentecostFestive glow: Christmas light trails around the UK

Flight Lieutenant Walker: a compelling tale of bravery from the RAF Benevolent Fund

With Remembrance Day taking place last month, we found ourselves in a thoughtful mood and, by way of remembering our lost heroes, taking another look at The RAF Benevolent Fund’s Online Book of Remembrance.

One entry in particular leaped out at us. A lovely and touching tribute to Flight Lieutenant William Louis Buchanan Walker, it is also a compelling slice of history, including as it does, an account of his experiences in the Second World War.

Fl. Lt. William Walker oldest surviving pilot from Battle of Britain

Born in 1913, Flight Lieutenant William Louis Buchanan Walker was 99 when he died, which had made him the oldest surviving pilot from the Battle of Britain.

Starting out as a brewer, Walker joined the RAF Volunteer Reserve on 2 September 1938, undergoing pilot training at RAF Kidlington, Oxford, and called up a year later on 1 September 1939, the day World War II broke out.

Posted to No. 616 Squadron RAF at RAF Leconfield in East Yorkshire as a pilot officer on probation, he flew the Supermarine Spitfire.

The tribute page takes the reader through comedic as well as plain hair-raising tales of his derring dos during the war – including the day he entered an air battle whilst still in training, only to be told later he’d gone up with his guns empty, and the time, with a bullet in his right ankle, he was forced to bail out of his Spitfire at 20,000 ft, landing in the English Channel and forced to await rescue whilst clinging to a shipwreck on the Goodwin Sands.

It’s stories like this that really bring home the realities of fighting in the First and Second World Wars, leaving us truly in awe, and so very thankful for what people like Walker did for us.

Happily Walker made it through the war safely, and went back to brewing, before turning to poetry in his retirement. One of his poems, ‘Our Wall’, was inscribed on the Battle of Britain Memorial in Kent alongside the 2,937 names of The Few in July 2010 as part of the 70th anniversary celebrations.

Our Wall

Walker’s story is just one of many incredible tales told in the RAF Benevolent Fund’s book. What a wonderful way of paying tribute to some very special people, and of truly engaging supporters with the cause.

You can take a look at the book and read William Walker’s tribute page in its entirety.

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Julie PentecostFlight Lieutenant Walker: a compelling tale of bravery from the RAF Benevolent Fund

A trip down memory lane with the Queen Mary

Once the epitome of luxury transatlantic travel, today the RMS Queen Mary, in all her Art Deco splendour, is still offering guests the finest food, entertainment and accommodation as a hotel, permanently berthed at California’s Long Beach.

So what’s her link to The Online Book Company?

Recently, the authorities in Long Beach who are responsible for RMS Queen Mary decided to pay tribute to her last voyage and all the people who sailed with her, from Captain Treasure Jones, to crew, entertainers, and passengers, through one of our online books.

The Last Great Cruise of RMS Queen Mary

As well as a history of the ship – including her use as a troop ship in WW2, and how she more than once carried London buses over the ocean to their new owners in Long Beach ­­– the book captures many of the wonderful and often quite remarkable stories from her last cruise and paints a very vivid picture of what life on board that majestic ship was like for those who sailed with her.

RMS Queen Mary at sea

One story told by the ship’s librarian Alastair Beers, who was also in charge of the post office tells of the vast quantities of mail people sent from the Queen Mary on that final voyage. The ship had to take on a supply of stamps from each country she made port in, but ran out almost immediately. At Las Palmas for example, the ship took on a supply of 7,000 Brazilian stamps – and sold out in a day.

Others are more serious – the stowaway who was feared to have brought amoebic dysentery or cholera on board with her after she snuck on board at Acapulco – luckily it was no more serious than ‘traveller’s blight’, and the deckhand that went missing following an unwanted advance only to be found hiding once the ship had turned around and spent a good three hours searching for him overboard.

Others are simply touching, such as those people for whom Queen Mary was quite simply a home, like leading fireman Albert Pearce who was on her maiden voyage, spent ten years in the boiler room before a stretch on the Queen Elizabeth before coming back for another 11, and said that when her boilers finally went out, his life would go out with them.

The book itself is embedded into the official Queen Mary website and with the stories also includes some wonderful photos and Pathe-type news clips. There is even a recording from Johnny Mathis and others too who helped mark the end of her golden era of travel.

Do have a look yourself, and if you know anyone who sailed on her, or have a story of someone who did, Queen Mary would be very happy to hear them so do include them in the book.

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Julie PentecostA trip down memory lane with the Queen Mary

Animal Requiem – Remembering Our Pets

When founder Rachel Fuller lost her much-loved pets, she sought to commemorate the profundity of that loss, and the joy of having animals by her side in life, with another passion she kept: music.

album cover Animal Requiem - Remembering Our Pets

Animal Requiem is the result of her skills as a composer, along with the collaboration and talents of Martin Batchelar, conductor Robert Ziegler, the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, the Chamber Choir of London, as well as features from Sir Paul McCartney and Alfie Boe. Animal Requiem has had worldwide acclaim, touring between London to Los Angeles, and has released its album in both the United Kingdom and as of October 2019, it will be available to purchase in the USA.

Animal Requiem celebrates the love and loss of animals through an album of resonant, carefully composed and arranged, classical music.

All proceeds from donations, as well as album and ticket purchases, go to pet charities and small independently run animal shelters, to continue the pledge to support animal welfare, a value Fuller has sustained since Animal Requiem’s inception. Contributions can be made through ArkAngels on the Animal Requiem site.

The Online Book Company has paired with Animal Requiem to design a space in which people can grieve the loss of a much-loved pet in an online sphere that sympathises, whilst honouring the impact pets have on our lives and the role they play in encouraging our compassion and care.

Animal Requiem online book

The Book of Remembrance has received and published hundreds of memorial entries so far, where individuals express their grief through sharing pictures and exchanging memories of their pets, their quirks and their mannerisms. It is an online entity that has developed a community that takes solace in a reminiscent arena. If you are interested in publishing a memorial to a lost loved pet, you can do so in the Book of Remembrance here.

Animal Requiem is now available to stream on Spotify, iTunes, Amazon MP3, Deezer, and Google Play.

Article written by Lydia Hounat
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Julie PentecostAnimal Requiem – Remembering Our Pets

Tutankhamun’s treasures pay a final visit to the UK

There can be few finds in history to have captured the imagination more than the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb in Egypt in 1922.

Discovered in the Valley of the Kings near Luxor by Lord George Carnarvon and Howard Carter, it took Carter six years to excavate the tomb of the boy king – who was crowned at 9 and dead by 19. By the time he had finished, he had uncovered more than 5,000 objects, many of which were made of solid gold, and including Tutankhamun’s incredible death mask.

As well as being famous for the many amazing finds the tomb held of course, it will forever be associated with the curse of the pharaohs, which, it is alleged, means that anyone who disturbs a mummy will suffer the consequences of illness, injury or death.

Bolstering this legend, Carnarvon famously died a few months after the discovery, from an infected mosquito bite, followed by a number of members of the team through various causes. Carter managed to live until 1939 but still died prematurely at the age of 64 from Hodgkin’s disease.

Hopefully the curse doesn’t stretch as far as sightseers. While many of the artifacts are held in Egypt, some have been on a global tour and with 4 November the anniversary of Lord Carnarvon and Howard Carter’s discovery, the exhibition is coming to London’s Saatchi Gallery.

TUTANKHAMUN: Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh runs from 2 November until 3 May next year and includes 150 pieces from the tomb. This is three times the quantity seen in previous exhibitions, and more than 60 of these are travelling outside of Egypt for the first time. London is the third stop on the exhibition’s tour, with the show the final chance to see the treasures before they return to Egypt forever for permanent display at the Grand Egyptian Museum when it opens in 2021.

You can find out more and book tickets here: https://tutankhamun-london.com/

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Julie PentecostTutankhamun’s treasures pay a final visit to the UK

Cruelty Free International urges swift government action to protect animals after Brexit

Cruelty Free International works tirelessly to end animal experiments and cruelty worldwide.

With the UK due to leave the EU at the end of this month, one campaign it is currently backing, alongside 40 animal organisations, is #BetterDealForAnimals, which calls on the government to urgently incorporate recognition of animal sentience into law.

Under EU law, the UK has to abide by Article 13 of the Treaty of Lisbon, which obliges full regard to be paid to the sentience of animals when developing and implementing public policy. With Brexit however, this will be lost from UK law.

Following a petition back in March that urged the government to ensure animal sentience continued to be recognised after Brexit, it stated that it was committed to making any necessary changes required to UK law to ensure this was the case when the UK leaves the EU. However, so far it has been slow to act, and without this, after 31 October animals will no longer be legally recognised as sentient beings with no legal requirement for government to pay regard to their needs when formulating and implementing policy.

Cruelty Free International believes that it is essential that government act as soon as possible so that the country does not leave the EU without sentience being part of UK legislation. That legislation should set out the process for how all government departments will assess and report on animal sentience, and how they will handle any associated animal welfare duties in all policy areas covered.

It should also include a power to establish an Animal Welfare Advisory Commission to support government – including individual departments and public bodies – in discharging its duty to animals, providing independent and transparent advice.

Cruelty Free International is asking supporters to encourage their MPs to urge the government to act now.

It’s an important campaign, and, with no government or lottery funding, the charity relies entirely on donations to continue its work. One way it honours its supporters is with its Book of Remembrance: a tribute to those who have left it a gift in their Will.  You can view it here.

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Julie PentecostCruelty Free International urges swift government action to protect animals after Brexit