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Thanking supporters of The Injured Jockeys Fund’s Peter O’Sullevan House Project

The Injured Jockeys Fund was founded following two devastating accidents at Aintree Racecourse in the 1960s. Firstly that of jockey Tim Brookshaw, and then four months later Paddy Farrell in the 1964 Grand National, both of which resulted in severe paralysis.

The Fund helps any rider who holds, or has held, a Professional or Amateur licence issued by the British Horseracing Authority, including any spouse, partner, child or dependant they may have. Since it was founded, it has helped over 1,000 jockeys and their families, contributing more than £18 million, and providing support at many levels including physio, strength and conditioning, nutritional advice, sports psychology and general pastoral care.

The Peter O'Sullevan House

It provides much of this support through its three rehabilitation and fitness centres. The most recent, Peter O’Sullevan House in Newmarket, Suffolk, opened on 12 August this year and, located next to the British Racing School, and will offer state-of-the-art facilities including physio treatment rooms, a hydrotherapy pool, and a gym.

hydrotherpy pool

To raise the sizeable amount needed to develop Peter O’Sullevan House, named after the well-known ‘Voice of Racing’ commentator, the charity launched a successful fundraising campaign, and to show its gratitude to its supporters and benefactors, recently launched an Online Book listing each one.

As well as donors’ names, the book also explains the Fund’s history, and contains information on the project. Pictures include one of the centre, as well as of a sculpture created by artist Tom Hill from 800 horseshoes, each one holding the name of a member of the public who donated £100 or more.

Tom Hill horseshoe sculpture

You can take a look at the book here.

 

Julie PentecostThanking supporters of The Injured Jockeys Fund’s Peter O’Sullevan House Project
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